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actuallygrimes:

oo

Jul 22    + 2163

artgif:

Yellow Pink Roses in a Glass Vase, Henri Fantin-Latour

artgif:

Yellow Pink Roses in a Glass Vase, Henri Fantin-Latour

(via mirroir)

Jul 21    + 400

Jul 21    + 58

(Source: mftb, via wallyedge)

Jul 21    + 28365

sowaaavy:

The World

Jul 20    + 1

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via sowaaavy)

Jul 20    + 40310

dentellesetfroufrous:

Great Gatsby Fever : 20 Pieces of Vintage 1920s Lingerie - The Lingerie Addict

1920′s silk and linen lingerie, via The Met Museum

dentellesetfroufrous:

Great Gatsby Fever : 20 Pieces of Vintage 1920s Lingerie - The Lingerie Addict

1920′s silk and linen lingerie, via The Met Museum

Jul 20    + 992

Jul 20

Filed as: best  

(Source: 2000ish, via andyouandeye)

Jul 20    + 10652

Filed as: me  

 

(Source: jinx-essss, via wallyedge)

Jul 20    + 95225

Jul 20

fioritoasil:

Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

fioritoasil:

Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

(Source: anti-romanticismo, via italiawasteland)

Jul 19    + 5184

ancientart:

The presentation of captives to a Maya ruler. This is taking place within a palace throne room, as indicated by the curtains to the top of the panel.
This carved relief was found in the Usumacinta River Valley, Mexico. It dates to c. AD 785 (Late Classic), and is made of limestone. It was likely used as a lintel over an entrance, or as a wall panel within a Maya building.

The five figures are the Yaxchilan king, seated at top left, his sahal (a military chief) on the right, and three bound captives in the lower left. The glyphic text, which gives a date of 23 August 783, records the capture of a lord and a sacrificial bloodletting three days later under the auspices of the king. The three prisoners may be scribes; the one in front holds a “stick-bundle” associated with Maya scribes, and all three wear headdresses with hun (book) knots. All figures but the leftmost captive are identified by name.
The inscription on the throne front, of special interest, is carved with the king’s name and titles; the glyphs are inscribed in reverse order, from right to left. The name of the artist responsible for sculpting the relief appears on the vertical panel of four glyphs under the sahal’s outstretched arm. Signed works of Maya art are rare, and the signature on this relief suggests that it was considered of great value in its time.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Kimbell Art Museum, Texas, USA. Photo taken by FA2010, in the public domain. AP 1971.07.

ancientart:

The presentation of captives to a Maya ruler. This is taking place within a palace throne room, as indicated by the curtains to the top of the panel.

This carved relief was found in the Usumacinta River Valley, Mexico. It dates to c. AD 785 (Late Classic), and is made of limestone. It was likely used as a lintel over an entrance, or as a wall panel within a Maya building.

The five figures are the Yaxchilan king, seated at top left, his sahal (a military chief) on the right, and three bound captives in the lower left. The glyphic text, which gives a date of 23 August 783, records the capture of a lord and a sacrificial bloodletting three days later under the auspices of the king. The three prisoners may be scribes; the one in front holds a “stick-bundle” associated with Maya scribes, and all three wear headdresses with hun (book) knots. All figures but the leftmost captive are identified by name.

The inscription on the throne front, of special interest, is carved with the king’s name and titles; the glyphs are inscribed in reverse order, from right to left. The name of the artist responsible for sculpting the relief appears on the vertical panel of four glyphs under the sahal’s outstretched arm. Signed works of Maya art are rare, and the signature on this relief suggests that it was considered of great value in its time.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Kimbell Art Museum, Texas, USA. Photo taken by FA2010, in the public domainAP 1971.07.

Jul 19    + 932

malformalady:

Arachnodactyly or ‘spider fingers’ is an hereditary condition characterized especially by excessive length of the fingers and toes. Long, slender fingers can be normal and not associated with any medical problems. In some cases, however, spider fingers can be a sign of an underlying disease.

malformalady:

Arachnodactyly or ‘spider fingers’ is an hereditary condition characterized especially by excessive length of the fingers and toes. Long, slender fingers can be normal and not associated with any medical problems. In some cases, however, spider fingers can be a sign of an underlying disease.

Jul 19    + 387

lykkeli:

By: Andreas Larsson

lykkeli:

By: Andreas Larsson

Jul 19    + 86

s.t.